Laboratories

Department of Pharmacology

Department of Pharmacology
We do collaborative research with pharmaceutical
manufacturers. Our students have been involved in
research leading to commercialization of therapeutic agents.
  We study the functions of the heart and cardiovascular system. Our approach involves investigating excitation-contraction mechanisms of the hearts of different animal species varying in terms of developmental stage and pathophysiological status. We also collaborate with other researchers in academia and the pharmaceutical industry on the development of novel therapeutic agents.
  The techniques that we use include blood pressure and electrocardiographic measurements of whole animals, electrophysiological measurements with isolated myocardial tissue and cells, and fluorescence imaging analysis of intracellular ion movements and enzymatic reactions. The fascinating world of heart research ranging from evolution to drug discovery is a never-ending source of delight to us.

Professor Hikaru Tanaka

Graduated from Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, in 1983. Doctor of pharmacy, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, 1988. Appointed research fellow at the National Institute of Neuroscience in 1988. Appointed lecturer at Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toho University, in 1991, associate professor in 1997, and professor in 2007.

Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Organic Chemistry Laboratory
“Looking for new chemical reactions is exciting.
You feel like a detective in a thriller. To boost the chances
of success, you have to pursue a logical approach that takes
you forward through a repeated cycle of interpreting
experimental results, proposing a hypothesis, performing
further experiments to verify the hypothesis, and proposing a
new hypothesis,”says Professor Kato.
  Metal ions bound to ligands containing N and O atoms form stable metal complexes. Pharmaceuticals show medicinal action owing to the formation of these metal complexes. Cisplatin, in which DNA of cancer cells serves as the ligand and is bound to platinum, is a notable example of such drugs.
  Professor Kato noticed that the reactivity of palladium (II) catalyst can be changed by adding bis (oxazoline) ligand. His papers presenting a method of selectively creating products by adding or not adding this ligand were published in a leading international chemistry journal (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2009, 48, 3326; 2011, 50, 3912).
  As well as researching new chemical reactions involving ligands, Professor Kato is searching for novel compounds leading to therapeutic agents for breast cancer, prostate cancer, and osteoporosis.

Professor Keisuke Kato

Professor Keisuke Kato
Born in Nagasaki in 1965. Graduated from Pharmaceutical Chemistry Division, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagasaki University. Master‘s in pharmaceutical chemistry from Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagasaki University, and doctorate in pharmaceutical chemistry from Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University. Assistant, Medical Chemistry Laboratory, School of Pharmacy, Showa University. Assistant and subsequently lecturer, Organic Chemistry Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toho University. Postdoctoral fellow, Minnesota State University. Appointed associate professor, Organic Chemistry Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toho University, and professor in April 2010.